New Dog For Christmas?

An article written by : Michael Schaier of Michael’s Pack

There is, that adorable face wrapped up with a big red bow. This is the gift that probably made someone the best parent in the world, or maybe this was the promise of commitment from the most loving caring significant other. Or perhaps it was the gift of joy and companionship to an elderly or lonely relative. That’s wonderful, who wouldn’t be thrilled? The questions now that the tree is down and everyone is back to their regularly scheduled lives, what do we do with this puppy?

puppy chritmas

Whether you have a full time job, live in a small space, or have health issues while a puppy in so many ways can be a blessing it can also be a burden. Since a puppy is a gift that is difficult to return, in order to make the most of your relationship with your new companion you will need to teach the pup some important skills that will help you all live harmoniously together under the same roof. As a professional dog trainer, I am fortunate to be able to engage in my passion on a full time basis. Being able to help bridge the communication gaps between man’s best friend and man himself is humbling to say the least. A large portion of my students are puppies. Which means, an even larger portion of my human clientele are puppy mommies and daddies. Many of my clients that have acquired or received a puppy, often say, “ What do I do now?” Showing your dog what is acceptable (potty training, sit, stay, etc..) and what isn’t ( jumping, pulling on a leash, etc…) will improve your life and enhance the bond between you and your dog.

It never fails to amaze me how dogs convey utter love, devotion, and loyalty to their humans, no questions asked. They don’t care about your race or religion, whether you are rich or poor, married or not! Your dog invariably will wrap himself around your heart and into your life. No agenda, no ulterior motives; just an endless supply of adoration and faithfulness. (And wet sloppy kisses, lots and lots of wet sloppy kisses!)

I truly believe the world would be a much better place if everyone experienced the love of a dog. They make us kinder, more compassionate humans. However, like most things in life this harmonious give and take love affair between dogs and us doesn’t come without challenges; and this challenge is often called PUPPYHOOD. Prepare your home and prepare your family. Spend whatever time you have with your puppy. Find a responsible and reputable trainer, you won’t regret it when they become dogs.

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Michael’s Pack Encourages You to Consider These Tips before Adopting a Pet This Holiday Season:

The holidays are a joyful time of year when many families  surprise loved ones with adorable dogs and puppies as gifts. Before you consider adopting a lovable, furry friend this holiday season, Michael’s Pack suggests these helpful tips:

  • Refrain from impulse adopting: 

    Just because a dog is cute and playful does not mean it’s the right dog for you. After meeting a certain dog, head home and do your homework — make sure the dog’s personality will fit in with your family. Get an idea about which breeds make up the dog you are considering by researching its common needs and habits.

  • Plan ahead: 

    Before going to pick up your dog, make sure your house is dog-ready. Put up gates where you do not want the dog to go so that he/she will not harm themselves. Also, make sure you put away sharp objects and/or anything that your pet could choke on so that they remain safe and accident-free.

If you own a dog already, make sure he/she will get along with your new furry friend. Take them to a neutral area where they can meet before the new dog is welcomed into your home — your previous dog may become extremely territorial.

  • Adopt an older dog: 

    Many people are reluctant to adopt an older dog due to their eagerness to want to adopt a puppy and fear that an older dog may not be able to adapt as well. However, an older dog can be beneficial for countless owners. For example, many are housebroken and already trained. Some older couples do not have the energy or time to go through the training process for a puppy; therefore, adopting an older dog would be their best option.

  •  Choose a dog that suits your lifestyle:

     Consider all of the aspects of your life and think about what type of dog would be best in your household. Get to know your potential dog’s personality. Instead of picking a dog that runs up to you and becomes overly excited, consider choosing one that has a more cautious personality. The ones that are initially more guarded and then open up are usually better adjusted and easier to train than the ones leaping into everyone’s arms.

    Also, consider adopting a mixed-breed dog. Many mutts are in shelters and are not adopted due to the popular demand of purebred puppies and “designer” dogs. Unbeknownst to many, mutts are just as lovable and are known to be great companions with excellent health.

 

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“If you consider these helpful and simple tips, you will be sure to find your ideal dog that will be perfect for your home,” says Michael Schaier, Owner and Head Trainer, Michael’s Pack. “Extensive research and planning will ensure that you made the right decision in adopting a specific dog. The training and adaptive process will be less stressful and make everyone in your household content, as well as your new pet.”

Visit his blog for more great articles: click here

Visit his Parent / Caregiver Page on Momee Friends   —> here

parent and caregiver tool

michael book Purchase his book : on Amazon

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My name is Anne and I am a local mommy blogger ... Momee Friends is all about Long Island and all things local with the focus on family

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